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After a lower court ruled that the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Act compels her to create content for opposite-sex and same-sex couples, website designer Lorie Smith is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to consider whether the decision amounts to an unconstitutional burden on her religious exercise.

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A federal court has partially rejected a former U.S. Air Force Academy student's challenge to her disenrollment for an honor code violation, saying she had no constitutionally-protected interest in continuing as a cadet.

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Ryan Call, an attorney and former two-term chairman of the Colorado Republican Party, will lose his license to practice law after admitting he lied to members of his former law firm and concealed information about nearly $280,000 he transferred to himself from a political committee formed to support Donald Trump during the three years Call served as the committee's treasurer.

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Did the 1984 sale of the Denver Broncos to its late owner, Pat Bowlen, give the former owner's company the right to intervene before the team changes hands yet again?

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The federal trial court in Colorado is seeking to fill a vacancy for a magistrate judge based in Colorado Springs, following an announcement that Kathleen M. Tafoya will retire in January 2022.

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A federal court has reaffirmed that a former Colorado state employee fabricated evidence for his discrimination lawsuit, and will now consider the state's request to be awarded $300,000 in attorney fees.

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Federal public defender Veronica S. Rossman of Colorado became the Biden administration's 12th confirmed judicial nominee on Monday, as the U.S. Senate voted 50-42 to approve her appointment to the federal appeals court based in Denver.

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Judge Theresa Slade sentenced Devon Erickson on Friday to life in prison plus 1,282.5 years for his role in the May 7, 2019 murder of Kendrick Castillo at STEM School Highlands Ranch and the attempted murders of others.

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The Colorado Supreme Court announced it will review three decisions from the state's Court of Appeals on subjects ranging from the ability of police to forcibly draw blood from a suspected drunk driver, to the law that criminalizes spitting on first responders, and whether Arapahoe County waited 10 years too long to sue a couple for Medicaid fraud.

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Being under arrest involves some combination of handcuffs, a police vehicle and not having the freedom to leave. But when, precisely, does someone become "under arrest?"

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Following an announcement from Attorney General Phil Weiser that the Aurora Police Department has engaged in a pattern of racially-biased policing and other illegal practices, Rep. Leslie Herod touted legislation passed last year that enabled the probe that uncovered those findings.

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The Colorado Supreme Court is weighing what to do with the conviction of a man who kidnapped, raped and attempted to murder a teenager in Denver decades ago, but whose trial may have been rendered unfair by excluding a juror of color because of the juror’s race.

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The federal government admitted that U.S. District Court Judge William J. Martínez committed the error, but argued the evidence to convict Jose Burciaga-Andasola was so overwhelming that the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit should decline to grant a new trial. A three-judge panel agreed.

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A federal judge did not create an unfair trial by disciplining and calling attention to the contemptuous behavior of SkyWest Airlines’ representatives during the trial, the appeals court based in Denver ruled, upholding a multimillion-dollar employment discrimination verdict against the company.

This week on Colorado Politicking, legislative reporter Pat Poblete and political correspondent Ernest Luning discuss Reps. Joe Neguse, D-Lafayette, and Lauren Bobert, R-Silt, being drawn into the same legislative district and the latest from the campaign trail. Meanwhile, judicial reporter Michael Karlik previews three cases the state Supreme Court is set to take up when it returns next week.

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A lower court judge took a disabled inmate’s statements out of context and mistakenly concluded it was reasonable for the state to offer him nothing but adult diapers for his condition, the federal appeals court based in Denver decided on Wednesday in reinstating the man’s civil rights lawsuit against the Colorado Department of Corrections.

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Through the end of the year, there will be a total of 32 vacancies in most of the state's 22 judicial districts plus the statewide commission that screens applicants for the Court of Appeals and Colorado Supreme Court. Non-lawyers comprise a majority of each panel.

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A federal judge has denied Aurora police officers qualified immunity in a wrongful death lawsuit stemming from the fatal 2019 shooting of Shamikle Jackson, who was experiencing a mental health crisis at the time of his killing.

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A federal class action lawsuit hopes to force Colorado to find appropriate placements for children with the most severe mental health issues. The lawsuit claims the state has shirked its federally-mandated duties and prefers to rely on hospitals to take children with the most serious mental health disorders.

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Lawmakers did not intend for Colorado's revenge porn law to apply only to images of fully-exposed female anatomy, the Court of Appeals decided on Thursday, rejecting a man's argument that the suggestive pictures he posted of his ex-fiancé without her consent did not amount to a crime.

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Although guidance from the federal court system expressly allows for corporate sponsorship of investiture receptions, multiple people told Colorado Politics they were surprised to learn such an arrangement was possible, and that the practice of law firms wining and dining judges could, on the surface, appear problematic.

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The narrow ruling on Monday from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit implicated a 2015 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Rodriguez v. United States. A majority of justices in that case found officers, without reasonable suspicion, may not make "detours" from the original mission that prolong the traffic stop.

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One of the last three men to be on Colorado's death row, now serving a life sentence in prison, is asking the Court of Appeals to grant him a new trial because of the pervasive unfairness Sir Mario Owens believes led to his 2007 murder conviction.