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WASHINGTON — Neil Gorsuch became the Supreme Court’s newest member a year ago this Tuesday. President Donald Trump’s pick for the high court, its 113th justice, has now heard more than 60 cases on issues including gerrymandering, fees paid to unions and the privacy of certain cellphone records.

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Federal environmental regulators are seeking “input and wisdom” from Colorado as they begin the process of rewriting a Barack Obama-era water protection rule known as WOTUS, which the White House says it now wants aligned with a Supreme Court opinion on water rights from the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

With Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation as the 113th Supreme Court justice expected on Friday, it won’t be long before he starts revealing what he really thinks about a range of hot topics he repeatedly sidestepped during his confirmation hearing. In less than two weeks, the justices will take up a Missouri church’s claim that the state is stepping on its religious freedom. It’s a case about Missouri’s ban on public money going to religious institutions and it carries with it potential implications for vouchers to attend private, religious schools.

The vote was 55-45, short of the 60 needed to advance Gorsuch over procedural hurdles to a final vote. All 44 Democrats and independents voted against advancing Gorsuch, and for procedural reasons, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell cast his vote with them to enable the vote to be reconsidered. Many senators voted from their seats, a rare and theatrical occurrence, then stayed in the chamber for the drama yet to unfold.

A deeply divided Senate panel favorably recommended Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch on Monday, sending the nomination to the full Senate for what is expected to be a partisan showdown — and eventual confirmation. The 11-9 committee vote for President Donald Trump’s nominee, strictly along party lines, came shortly after Democrats secured enough votes to block the nomination in the full Senate. But that Democratic success was virtually certain to be a short-lived political victory, as Republicans vowed to change Senate rules to put Gorsuch on the court and score a much-needed win for their party.

While his vote may be in the minority regarding Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation as a U.S. Supreme Court justice, U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet’s position and intent toward the process and Gorsuch himself have fueled political speculation and concerns over consequences. Gorsuch, a Colorado native and Denver-based federal appeals court judge, was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the seat vacated a year ago by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. Gorsuch, the son of the late Anne Gorsuch who was EPA chief under Ronald Reagan, would be the second Coloradan on the Supreme Court. Byron “Whizzer” White retired in 1993.

Our election process is being hijacked by big money interests, and if we don’t take a stand today, tomorrow will be too late. To save our electoral process, the Colorado General Assembly must pass a bill this session delaying the implementation of Proposition 108. Proposition 108 was passed by the voters last November but it was sold under false pretenses. Based on the 2016 presidential caucuses, there were many Democrats and Republicans who were justifiably angry that they couldn’t vote for their preferred presidential candidate.