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President Joe Biden speaks during a meeting with the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House Campus, Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., speaks on the phone at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. (AP Photo/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades)

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Majority Whip Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., alongside other members of the Congressional Black Caucus, stands in front of the Senate chambers to voice his support of voting rights legislation at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. (AP Photo/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades)

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. goes down an escalator at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. (AP Photo/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades)

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In the front row, from left, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., Rep. Terri Sewell and D-Ala., Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, alongside other members of the Congressional Black Caucus, speak near the Senate chamber about their support of voting rights legislation at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. (AP Photo/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades)

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From left, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., and Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., attend a press conference regarding the Democratic party's shift to focus on voting rights at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022. (AP Photo/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades)

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FILE - Rep. Cori Bush, D-Mo., speaks during an interview Nov. 12, 2021, in Northwoods, Mo. Bush is no stranger to protests. She spent years marching the streets of St. Louis and Ferguson, Mo., rising to public office on the strength of her activism. But as she looked out the window of the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, only her third day as a member of Congress, she knew what was about to take place would be no peaceful protest. The Confederate flags in the crowd, and the makeshift noose and gallows erected on the Capitol grounds, spoke to a more sinister reality. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

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FILE - Rep. Cori Bush, D-Mo., speaks during an interview Nov. 12, 2021, in Northwoods, Mo. Bush is no stranger to protests. She spent years marching the streets of St. Louis and Ferguson, Mo., rising to public office on the strength of her activism. But as she looked out the window of the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, only her third day as a member of Congress, she knew what was about to take place would be no peaceful protest. The Confederate flags in the crowd, and the makeshift noose and gallows erected on the Capitol grounds, spoke to a more sinister reality. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

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FILE - Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., delivers opening remarks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on Capitol Hill in Washington, on July 27, 2021. The Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection by pro-Trump supporters and right-wing group members shattered the sense of security that many had long felt at Capitol as rioters forcefully delayed the certification of President Joe Biden's election victory. But for people of color, the attack was more than a violent challenge to a free and fair election, it was an eerily familiar display of white supremacist violence. (Chip Somodevilla/Pool via AP)