Search / 5 results found

from
to

… Thirty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman … Daniel Schorr, a nationally known CBS and cable newsman, spoke to several hundred attendees on March 27 at the B.H.M. Synagogue in Denver during a speech entitled “A Jew In Journalism.” During the talk, Schorr honed in on the timely news of Jonathan Pollard and the surrounding controversy regarding his alleged leaking of state secrets. Pollard “is what you get when you go off the rails,” Schorr said.

The People’s Democratic Republic of Oregon. That has a kind of ring to it, don’t you think? The reason this phrase has crystallized in my mind: Just after it was confirmed that Donald Trump had defeated Hillary Clinton, a petition was submitted for a ballot initiative to have Oregon secede from these United States. “Oregonian values are no longer the values held by the rest of the United States,” Christian Trejbal, a freelance writer who filed the Oregon Secession Act, told the Oregonian, a Portland-based daily newspaper.

“Close only counts in horseshoes.” The old adage is nowhere more meaningful than at national political conventions. This round, Democrats are salivating at the opportunity to run against Donald Trump in November; but, truth be told, he is becoming increasingly less likely to emerge as the Republican nominee. One minor historical fact consistently overlooked is that never has a frontrunner been nominated at an “open” or “contested” American political convention of either major party on the first ballot. Colorado Republicans just made such a situation a little more likely in 2016. Think about it. If Trump fails, as appears increasingly likely, to secure 1,273 delegates before arriving in Cleveland, he will almost certainly return to New York as a footnote — albeit a lengthy one — to the 2016 Presidential race.