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Donovan, the Democratic Senate president pro tempore, said Coloradans should take advantage of the Federal Communications Commission's new Emergency Broadband Benefit to lower the cost of the increasingly critical service during the COVID-19 pandemic — up to $50 a month for eligible households, and up to $75 for those on qualifying tribal lands. Continue Reading

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The report, "Spend Now, Save Later: Impacts of $500M to PERA," looks at the benefits of putting a combination of money from the state budget surplus and federal stimulus directly into the state's Public Employees' Retirement Association, or PERA, which manages the retirement money for roughly 620,000 Coloradans. Continue Reading

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U.S. District Court Senior Judge John L. Kane agreed to amend his judgment from last year that the Justice Department’s requirement for states and localities to cooperate with the federal government on immigration enforcement infringed on Congress’s spending authority. Kane rescinded the finding “to avoid the unnecessary resolution of a constitutional question.” Continue Reading

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A group devoted to defeating U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert at the ballot box is auctioning off the logo used by Shooters Grill, the Silt Republican's gun-themed restaurant in Rifle, after a comedian said Boebert's congressional office demanded he take down a parody website filled with unflatterin… Continue Reading

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By 2-1, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit agreed with Hunter Trey Venezia that officers who took him into custody at a Lakewood motel following a traffic violation had insufficient grounds to impound his car and perform a warrantless search in violation of the Fourth Amendment. Continue Reading

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"We will always love and support each other; however, we have determined that we have simply grown apart and desire different goals in life," a statement from Hancock and Lee read. "We shared many wonderful moments during our time together, and cherish the blessings of our children, and now our first grandchild." Continue Reading

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The family history and childhood of Regina M. Rodriguez took center stage at her confirmation hearing on Wednesday, as President Joe Biden's judicial nominee traced the path from her mother's World War II internment in a Wyoming camp for Japanese Americans to her three-decade career in the law. Continue Reading