071020-cp-web-oped-feedback-1

(iStock image)

(Re: 'Report: Public discipline recommended against 3 judges in 2019...,' July 7)

Shouldn't the very low number (three out of 217) of actual 2019 disciplinary actions against erring Colorado judges raise a red flag?

Why should even the contents of all such proceedings be kept secret, as is now mandated under misdemeanor penalty by Colorado law? 

Why should disciplinary actions against judges being considered for higher court positions be kept secret from nominating committees — and voters?

Shouldn't the annual rejection rate of 97% of all complaints against judges since 1993, when Colorado's Supreme Court rewrote the disciplinary rules, seemingly favoring its own, call for investigation and much-needed reforms? 

Shouldn't the very composition of the present Commission on Judicial Discipline (four Judges, two lawyers, six legal professionals, and only four citizens) raise questions regarding its objectivity?

Why is even the commission's budget kept secret from our legislature?

Shouldn't the judging of the judges and others be done elsewhere?

Why should Colorado be an outlier on secrecy when 34 states, the American Bar Association and the American Judicature Society presently mandate judicial transparency?

Wouldn't we have better judges if their records were made public?

Shouldn't Colorado Politics resurrect the fight for judicial integrity, a former citizen-led project which was castrated by Amendment 71's hobbling of the initiative process? 

Rusell W. Haas

Golden

Send us your feedback: Click here.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.