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Colorado voters are sharply divided along partisan lines on nearly every aspect of the year-old coronavirus pandemic — including how concern over COVID-19 has affected their mental state, whether they plan to get vaccinated and how state government should respond to the public health and economic crisis, according to results of a statewide survey of registered voters released Friday. Continue Reading

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"Today, I offer this division of labor: Keep states focused on intercity and interstate corridors — with resources from the National Highway Performance Program," Denver Mayor Michael Hancock testified remotely. "Two, use the Surface Transportation Block Grants to local areas to lift the economy — from the local level up — and accelerate progress on the key priorities before us."

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Members of the joint Capital Development Committee heard often-emotional testimony Thursday from the descendants of those massacred at Sand Creek in 1864, and why they want to see a memorial to the Cheyenne and Arapahoe who died there on the west side of the state Capitol.  Continue Reading

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Senate Bill 73 would redefine child sexual abuse and other offenses against adults and children as sexual misconduct, and then remove the time limit on civil legal action. Under Senate Bill 88, survivors can bring claims against individuals as well as organizations that operate youth programs, including public entities. They may do so if the organization knew or should have known about a risk of abuse to minors and did not address the risk or warn participants. Continue Reading

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In an effort to find money to help energy industry workers transition to new careers, State Rep. Matt Soper, R-Delta, has resurrected an idea that has been attempted four times: privatize the quasi-public workers’ compensation insurance division, Pinnacol Assurance.  Continue Reading

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The number of civil cases filed in federal court in Colorado rose by 39% between 2000 and 2019, and the administrative body for the judiciary has called for two additional judges to handle the workload in the state. However, the rate of cases that make it to trial has slowly dropped over the past two decades, now comprising less than 1% of civil cases annually. Continue Reading