US Senate hopefuls vow to help Trinity Test descendants

This July 16, 1945, photo, shows the mushroom cloud of the first atomic explosion at Trinity Test Site, New Mexico. The National Cancer Institute says its long-anticipated study into the cancer risks of New Mexico residents living near the site of the world's first atomic bomb test likely will be published in 2019. Institute spokesman Michael Levin told The Associated Press that researchers are examining data on diet and radiation exposure and expect to finish the study by early next year.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Residents of a New Mexico Hispanic village near the site of the world's first atomic bomb test plan to return to Washington, D.C., to press Congress about compensation.

The Tularosa Basin Downwinders are holding a second annual benefit on Sunday in Albuquerque to raise money so members can speak before a Congressional committee about the effects of the Trinity Test on generations of Tularosa residents.

Members of the consortium say many who lived in the area weren't told about the dangers and were diagnosed with rare forms of cancer. They say they want acknowledgment and compensation from the U.S. government.

Scientists working in the then-secret city of Los Alamos developed the atomic bomb as part of the Manhattan Project.

Tina Cordova says members hope to speak before the U.S. House Judiciary Committee later this year.

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