COVER STORY | Rural electric cooperatives look at cutting the cord

Craig Station, a coal-fired power plant in northwest Colorado. The Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association co-owns the plant. (Jimmy Thomas / Wikimedia Commons)

A Colorado-based power provider serving four states has voted for the federal government to regulate it.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will oversee the Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association and set its electric rates.

Westminster-based Tri-State says the move will give it more flexibility than being regulated by four states where it serves electric cooperatives: Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico and Nebraska.

Colorado lawmakers say they asked for a delay in the decision last week because they wanted more time to determine the implications of the change.

A new law requires Colorado regulators to approve Tri-State's plans for where it gets its power, whether from coal or renewable sources.

State agencies say their ability to regulate planning, emissions and environmental issues will not change.

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