• Updated

Eric Sondermann: "With all that is regained, it is important to remember some of the very different features of this past year through which we lived. Many of the adaptations were not of our choosing. But now, coming out the other side, some are worth retaining in whole or in part."

  • Updated

Ernest Luning: "In conversations with political insiders lately, it's become nearly as common as remarking on the weather to ask if there's news about a Republican running for any number of top-ticket offices, and the answers are usually the same."

  • Updated

Eric Sondermann: "In Colorado and the vast majority of other states, the top election officials with the solemn responsibility of fairly and impartially administering our democracy’s central feature are themselves partisan actors elected through a partisan process."

  • Updated

Ernest Luning catches up with Weston Imer, known as "the kid of the Trump campaign" in Colorado, who hopes some of that Trump magic can rub off on the long-shot bid of his mom, Laurel Imer, to unseat eight-term Democratic U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter. 

  • Updated

Joey Bunch: "As soon as this week we may know everything the government knows about UFOs, after a series of videos showing spacecraft zipping about left respected national leaders, from Hillary Clinton to Marco Rubio, wanting to know more."

  • Updated

Lynn Bartels: "This year, we are grateful that some schools are holding in-person graduations, although all sorts of precautions have been taken. The deaths from COVID-19 were just ramping up when most in-person graduations were canceled last year."

  • Updated

Eric Sondermann: "Now, a mature, experienced, occasionally poised me enjoys public speaking and rarely sweats it. But way back then, as an extra-young novice, not so much. I was essentially a field organizer and barely familiar with the candidate’s position papers. You can imagine that a few hours of panicked cramming ensued. This is where George Will enters the frame."

  • Updated

Ernest Luning: "The Colorado Springs Republican, serving his eighth term in Congress, has had more close calls than a long-tailed cat on a porch full of rocking chairs."

  • Updated

Eric Sondermann: "Here we are a full half-year past the election (and after all major news organizations, including Fox News and other conservative outlets, declared a Biden victory), and Trump’s party, led by the impresario himself, are firmly, defiantly, unmovably stuck between the grieving stages of denial and anger."

  • Updated

Columnist Eric Sondermann took a look at the respective benches in both the Republican and Democratic parties and consulted leading consultants and operatives to determine a number of up-and-comers in each party.

  • Updated

Eric Sondermann: "The indiscriminate, untargeted, one-size-fits-all nature of these (stimulus) payments speaks to a government with more wallet than refined strategy. Even if that wallet is illusory, consisting of trillions after trillions of indebtedness and money borrowed from next generations."

  • Updated

Ernest Luning: "Neguse, of Lafayette, landed in the top 10% of House members on the scale, which measures how often lawmakers' legislation attracts co-sponsors from across the aisle and how often they sign on to bills sponsored by members of the other party."

  • Updated

Joey Bunch: "With Gov. Jared Polis' signature, the legislation would change the age to 80, and all drivers younger than that have to attest they've had an eye exam in the past year. Those older than 80 would still have a doctor's note showing an exam the previous six months."

  • Updated

The news came down like a thunderbolt: an ex-cop police from Minneapolis would see the inside of a prison for killing George Floyd. Colorado leaders, especially those who live behind the bars of prejudice, exhaled.

  • Updated

Eric Sondermann: "When all the hollering is over and the legislative session finally adjourns, much of the post-mortem analysis will center on the major bills passed. ... However, at the moment, it seems that such affirmative steps would be gravy. And that the most important service our elected representatives could render would be to summarily kill a number of ill-considered, unnecessary proposals that have arisen from various quarters."

  • Updated

Ernest Luning: "Ten years ago this month, Colorado's political world might not have been any kinder, but the pace and daily pressure seem gentler, if only through the gauze of the years."

  • Updated

Colorado legislators have had much to face this session, and statehouse reporter Marianne Goodland has been there every step of the way, showing the lighter side of the state Capitol ... usually. Find a selection of her columns from this session.

  • Updated

Eric Sondermann: "Twenty-one years ago as we turned the page on a new century, our national indebtedness stood at roughly $5.6 trillion. Today, it exceeds $28 trillion and is headed north at a speedy, unrestrained clip."

  • Updated

Ernest Luning: "Burton Brown, who steps up from the state GOP’s vice chairman position to the top job, inherits the reins of a party on the rocks, reeling from historic setbacks in the last two cycles that left Democrats fully in charge of state government and holding six of Colorado’s nine seats in Washington, along with every statewide office except an at-large seat on the CU board of regents."

  • Updated

Lynn Bartels: "Yes, on the same day that Gov. Jared Polis asked his subjects to participate in a 'MeatOut Day' to 'educate consumers about the benefits of a healthful, plant-based diet,' I joined plenty of other Coloradans in consuming meat."

  • Updated

Ernest Luning: "In Colorado, where Democrats have been in charge across the board for two years longer, Republicans are licking their chops at the chance to stage a comeback after years of diminishing clout at the ballot box and two straight cycles racking up historic losses."

  • Updated

Eric Sondermann: "Our nation and its political system require two viable, healthy, constructive, responsible parties. While Democrats, no doubt, face plenty of internal challenges, it is the Republican Party that has lost its moorings and run off the rails. It has fallen prey to a pervasive intellectual and moral rot that can be cured only with a deep disinfectant."

  • Updated

Columnist Eric Sondermann offers a baker’s dozen observations — some with a political angle, others not so much — after spending a month on the road in an RV.

  • Updated

Eric Sondermann: "While the focus is appropriately on looking forward with hope, it is important also to look back honestly on the presidential term just ended and what the nation endured. And that from which we escaped with good fortune."

  • Updated

Eric Sondermann: "From the moment [Donald Trump] took the oath four years ago in front of, 'the largest audience ever to witness an inauguration, period,' anyone imagining him walking away from the Oval Office willingly, gracefully and in keeping with the quintessentially American tradition since Washington of the peaceful transfer of power was likely engaged in a flight of fancy."

  • Updated

Eric Sondermann: "An ever-widening disparity between how much government the country wants and what it is willing to pay for puts ever-darker red numbers on the national balance sheet as far as the eye can see."