STEPHANIE LUCK

Campaign website: stephanieluck.org

Biography

  • In addition to acquiring her law license out-of-state and living abroad, Stephanie Luck strengthened non-profit organizations, operated for-profit entities, taught in public school, and defended unalienable liberties. Her diverse skill set and range of experience uniquely position her to effectively serve in the increasingly complex realm of public policy. 

  • Stephanie is a Colorado-native and current resident of Penrose – an unincorporated community in Fremont County – where she has learned firsthand the importance of water and agriculture. She has served as President of the Penrose Chamber of Commerce, as a Community Board Member with Fremont County Communities that Care, and as a behind-the-scenes volunteer on a number of other community initiatives. 

Why do you want this job?

  • I desire to serve in the legislature, working alongside the people of Colorado, in order to build a state: 

  1. Committed to good governance under the rule of law; where corrupt actors are replaced by just and servant-hearted leaders; where decisions are made with the long-range good of the citizen in mind, not just the results of the next election; where our unalienable rights – like the right to speak freely, believe freely, associate freely, carry a weapon, access due process – are upheld; 

  2. Whose people value life; where suicide and abortion are no longer commonplace but anomalies; where the elderly, infirm and disabled are embraced fully into community and not left forgotten in nursing homes or apartments; 

  3. Where families are whole and healed; where the right of parents to direct and control the upbringing of their children is protected in every setting, including the classroom and doctor’s office; where drugs no longer devastate relationships or steal the hope of our next generation; where those struggling with mental illness can find healing; 

  4. Whose infrastructure is maintained at a high level of excellence; where people can trust that the water they’re drinking won’t harm them or the bridges they’re driving over won’t give out under them; where taxes are stewarded well and often reduced or returned to the taxpayer; where the federal, state, and local governments recognize their jurisdictional limitations and respect the 9th & 10th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution; 

  5. Where people with a dream can start a business without having to overcome countless barriers to entry and can run that business unburdened by unnecessary regulation and according to their consciences; where rural communities are honored and preserved; where teachers experience academic freedom; and where children are taught to think critically and to act with virtue. 

Budgeting in tough times 

(Choose one to answer)

> What is one bill you plan to sponsor that won't cost taxpayers anything?

> What new ideas do you bring in a time of budget cuts?

  • Colorado needs a paradigm shift. For too long our state has acted like a woman competing for Mother-of-the-Year. It has felt compelled to take on every project and to solve every problem – real or imagined; it has done this with vigor, as if the world would crumble if it failed to act. Each year its reach extends further; its ideas become more grandiose; and its ears further deafen to the cries of its people. 

  • So often we think of progress in terms of bigger, better, and more, yet the natural world teaches us a different principle. When an orchardist wants more fruit from a tree, he prunes. Sometimes he cuts back so much that it seems the tree might die, but when done skillfully, a heavy pruning will bear an abundant harvest. It’s time for Colorado to embrace a season of heavy pruning in both its statutes and budgets. 

  • What I am suggesting is not new. For years, financial planners and personal coaches have advised their clients to reflect on their present actions, to reprioritize in light of their future goals, and to discard everything that would thwart their efforts. If our leaders were to carefully examine every law and program – no matter how old or entrenched – and discard those that are (1) inefficient; (2) ineffective; (3) a hindrance on liberty; and/or (4) outside the role and responsibility of state government, many of the problems we’re facing would be resolved.

Perennial budget issues

(Choose one to answer)

> How do we pay for education?

> How do we pay for transportation?

  • According to CDE data, local school districts receive an average of $15,000 per pupil each year. For a classroom of 25, this amounts to approximately $375,000. Therefore, it seems to me that the question is not “How do we pay for education?” but instead “For what in education are we paying?” 

  • Our teachers bemoan their salaries. Some of our schools are in disrepair. Over 50% of our traditional public school students will either not graduate or not be prepared to take a freshmen college course. We assuredly have a problem in education, but it goes deeper than funding. 

  • As such, our communities must be encouraged to engage in conversations about education: its purpose, its format, its content, its goals, and its funding priorities. These local communities must then be empowered to introduce solutions that best address the realities faced by their students, teachers, and neighborhoods without fear of reprisal from federal, state, and local governments.

Issues of the pandemic

(Choose one to answer) 

> Is the state reopening too quickly or too slowly?

> Are health care reforms an immediate priority?

> What are the best steps to rebuilding the economy? 

  • If we want our communities to prosper, we must release our people from the barriers and burdens that strangle both entrepreneurial start-ups and established businesses. We must allow our people to walk in freedom – the freedom to contract, the freedom to own and use property, and the freedom to pursue even the most creative of dreams.

Working together

(Choose one to answer)

> What is an idea or approach your primary opponent has proposed that you intend to take to the Capitol?

> Name a current or former legislator from the opposing party you admire, and why.

  • Louisiana Senator Katrina Jackson advocated for the equal application of health and safety standards for all out-patient health clinics, including those performing abortions. In so doing, she chose principle over party, her constituents’ needs over her own comforts, and faithfulness to God over the approval of others.


RON PARKER

Campaign website: parker47.com

Biography

  • My father moved our family to Colorado in 1976 after he retired from the US Army. I went on to be come a US Army Veteran also. I moved to Pueblo to continue my college career and meet my wife Jean of 33 years. We raised 6 children and fostered 6 more in the 35 years I have lived in HD 47. During this time I earned a BS in Mathematics and a degree in Education from then USC now CSU Pueblo. I also earned a Masters in Education with an emphasis in computers. This helped in my 28 year career as an educator for the Colorado Dept. of Corrections. The last 18 years as the High school Math Teacher for the Youthful Offender System. I have coached my children in youth sports. I also officiate High School Baseball and Softball.  

Why do you want this job?

  • I have not been pleased with the way Colorado's values have shifted extremely left. People I talked with also expressed the same sentiments. They asked me to run and since I am retired and have plenty of time to devote to HD47 I thought it over and said I would. This is just another way I have served the people of America. First as a soldier in the US Army, then has a member of the Colorado Dept. of Corrections. I have given most of my life serving the people and I thought this was another way I could give back. 

Budgeting in tough times 

(Choose one to answer)

> What is one bill you plan to sponsor that won't cost taxpayers anything?

> What new ideas do you bring in a time of budget cuts?

  • Moving the Homestead Act to TABOR so the elderly and disabled vets will not have to worry about losing this exemption ever again.

Perennial budget issues

(Choose one to answer)

> How do we pay for education?

> How do we pay for transportation?

  • We pay for education by cutting out all the wasteful spending and give each child the same amount for the school of their choice. That school can be any accredited by the CDE.

Issues of the pandemic

(Choose one to answer) 

> Is the state reopening too quickly or too slowly?
> Are health care reforms an immediate priority?
> What are the best steps to rebuilding the economy? 

  • The state is opening too slowly. Too many small business have failed now, and it is time to save the business that we can. If someone feels uncomfortable going to an open establishment they can stay home, but the rest of the people of Colorado should not be locked up.

Working together

(Choose one to answer)

> What is an idea or approach your primary opponent has proposed that you intend to take to the Capitol?

> Name a current or former legislator from the opposing party you admire, and why.

  • Way back in the 70's and early 80's we had Governor Lamm. He worked well with the legislators to achieve a positive growth in Colorado. He showed it was possible to work with the other party in putting Colorado First.

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